Puzzle Dimension is, without a doubt, a puzzle platformer. There are platforms, and by Jove, there are puzzles too.

The aim of Puzzle Dimension is to move a ball around a floating stage, and gather all of the sunflowers. Who knows why an ancient-looking ball would need to collect sunflowers? Perhaps it wants to decorate its household garden. Maybe it just really, really likes to chew on sunflower seeds. All I know for sure is that you need them. Only crumbling platforms, slippery ice, flame pits, and of course various other obstacles stand in your way. Not to mention gravity

You may remember Kula World on the original PlayStation. It’s a similar concept to this game, and for good reason. Jesper Rudberg, lead designer of Puzzle Dimension, was also co-founder of Game Design Sweden AB, the studio behind Kula World. So exact same game, except this time the ball is a ball of stone, and not a beach ball.

I kid, I kid. Puzzle Dimension makes its own path, and Kula World is simply inspiration.

Using the right analog stick you control the in-game camera, and the direction your ball will travel in. There is also a jump button for minding gaps and leaping over obstacles. While turning can take a while to get used to, most levels don’t require split second reflexes. On most platforms you can stop, rest, and plan your next move.

It’s a game about patience.

One wrong move and off the stage you go. Either that or you are burnt, or disintegrated. Someway, somehow, you’ll meet an untimely demise. Many stages are a painstaking trial and error process. You will need to replay a level quite a few times over until you’ve learned the pattern to nab every flower and safely find an exit.

The puzzles are challenging, and thankfully for a game with the word puzzle in its title, you do have to use your noggin for the most part. Though there are those few levels you can knock out in a single turn.

Closing Comments
With exactly 100 stages, and rocking an 8-bit chiptune soundtrack, you’ll be collecting flowers in style, and for quite a while too. If you like your puzzles with platforms and switches, and if travelling upside down doesn’t make you spew, I highly recommend your brain take a trip to the Puzzle Dimension.

Available on PSN for $18.90 NZD. Also available on PC and Mac.

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6 thoughts on “Puzzle Dimension Review

  1. That right there is a tiny review.

    What were your thoughts on the graphics/sound/level design?
    In what ways is it different to Kula World?

    All I got is that it has puzzles and you’re a ball collecting flowers…..
    You didn’t even say if it was good or not, or whether it was worth my money. :

  2. That right there is a tiny review.

    What were your thoughts on the graphics/sound/level design?
    In what ways is it different to Kula World?

    All I got is that it has puzzles and you’re a ball collecting flowers…..
    You didn’t even say if it was good or not, or whether it was worth my money. :

  3. Thanks for the feedback.

    It was intentionally written short. Not everyone wants to read a 1000 word review on a downloadable game, but you bring up some good points.

    I usually don’t mention the graphics in a review unless I think they would have a major impact on players. The graphics aren’t anything special in this case. They do the job, but for an indie game I didn’t think it was an important aspect. There’s only so much you can do (art-wise) with floating platforms. You can select different background themes if you wish.

    I did mention there was an 8-bit soundtrack, but I probably should have ‘directly’ said that I did enjoy it. Sound design isn’t a major priority for me in a puzzle game. For a game that’s trying to be immersive, say a Far Cry 2, than I would mention it there. Depends on the game.

    The level design / puzzle design is well thought out. As mentioned, it is challenging, and you do need to take your time with it, learning from your mistakes. It’s a little tricky describing such a game that relies heavily on your spatial intelligence. You really need to see it front of you. As far as basic gameplay goes, you can roll onto the next adjacent square, or leap over a square. Ice impedes you, and jump pads will fire you off the edge if you’re not careful. The levels continue to teach new concepts, making later stages more complex.

    It would probably be unfair for me to properly compare it Kula World. My memory of that game is pretty far gone, save for a few YouTube videos still roaming about. I would say Puzzle Dimension refines the gameplay. For instance, instead of rolling into tons of easy to reach collectibles, you only need the flowers placed in strategic locations.

    In the closing comments section I mentioned that I highly recommended it — if — you’re into traditional puzzles games. I guess sometimes trying to be fancy with word-play might take away from some of my opinions.

  4. Thanks for the feedback.

    It was intentionally written short. Not everyone wants to read a 1000 word review on a downloadable game, but you bring up some good points.

    I usually don’t mention the graphics in a review unless I think they would have a major impact on players. The graphics aren’t anything special in this case. They do the job, but for an indie game I didn’t think it was an important aspect. There’s only so much you can do (art-wise) with floating platforms. You can select different background themes if you wish.

    I did mention there was an 8-bit soundtrack, but I probably should have ‘directly’ said that I did enjoy it. Sound design isn’t a major priority for me in a puzzle game. For a game that’s trying to be immersive, say a Far Cry 2, than I would mention it there. Depends on the game.

    The level design / puzzle design is well thought out. As mentioned, it is challenging, and you do need to take your time with it, learning from your mistakes. It’s a little tricky describing such a game that relies heavily on your spatial intelligence. You really need to see it front of you. As far as basic gameplay goes, you can roll onto the next adjacent square, or leap over a square. Ice impedes you, and jump pads will fire you off the edge if you’re not careful. The levels continue to teach new concepts, making later stages more complex.

    It would probably be unfair for me to properly compare it Kula World. My memory of that game is pretty far gone, save for a few YouTube videos still roaming about. I would say Puzzle Dimension refines the gameplay. For instance, instead of rolling into tons of easy to reach collectibles, you only need the flowers placed in strategic locations.

    In the closing comments section I mentioned that I highly recommended it — if — you’re into traditional puzzles games. I guess sometimes trying to be fancy with word-play might take away from some of my opinions.

  5. Awesome. Thanks Michael 😀
    Sometimes a couple more paragraphs really makes or breaks a review. You just helped paint a better picture for me 😀

  6. Awesome. Thanks Michael 😀
    Sometimes a couple more paragraphs really makes or breaks a review. You just helped paint a better picture for me 😀

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